Communicating Therapy: A teenage girl, her mother and grandmother looking at old photographs at home. Family and generations concept.

When communicating with someone, it can be frustrating and difficult when the aging parent/adult won’t listen or accept what is being told to them. Some adults are use to running their own business or household, but are now being told certain things they don’t agree with or comprehend. It’s dealing with those moments that can be hard or sad for the caregiver.

There are ways that can help you communicate with an aging parent or adult that can make life a little easier.

  1. Communicating Therapy: A teenage girl, her mother and grandmother looking at old photographs at home. Family and generations concept.Your parents are adults, treat them as such
    • Even though you may feel they are acting like stubborn children, they are not children. So conversations need to come from a place of respect and consideration of their condition. Don’t talk at them, but to them.
  2. It’s not what you say, but how you say it
    • Sometimes what you say can set off an aging adult. For example “Dad, I don’t think you should be driving anymore” may not go over very well. It is all about the tone. Try to have a soft or understanding tone when talking with your aging adult.
  3. It’s not you, it’s me
    • Try to make the situation about you when it comes to getting your aging adult to listen. Explain that you can’t sleep or concentrate because you are worried they will get in a car accident. Aging parents don’t want to become a burden on their families, so explain how their unwillingness to listen is in fact causing that burden.
  4. Include your aging parent in decision-making
    • Rather than lay down the law with your aging adult, talk to them about what you are wanting and bring them in on the decision. Ask what they would recommend and not tell them.

Information provided by DailyCaring.com